Evenwel v. Abbott: 1 person, 1 vote

Last Monday, the Supreme Court held that states are allowed to count all residents, regardless of voting eligibility, when drawing election districts. The decision clarifies the meaning within the principle of “one person one vote.”

Voting fight not over:

After receiving complaints about insufficient polling locations and significant waiting times, primarily in Latino communities, the DOJ’s Voting Section has reached out to Arizona. Arizona has until April 22nd to respond to the DOJ’s inquiry.

Pinellas County Civil Rights Investigation:

The U.S. Department of Education on Monday opened a civil rights investigation into whether the Pinellas County School District systematically discriminates against black children by denying them access to certain classes, special programs, quality teachers, and support staff.

Al Razak v. Obama: If wartime detention is permissible so long as there is a war going on, who decides when the war is over?

As discussed on Lawfare, a DC District Court judge reaffirmed the president’s current detention power, at the moment. But the court also suggested that a court can make the factual determination that “war” has ended, and thus detention no longer permissible on that basis.

Two GTMO detainees transferred:

While the courts have reaffirmed the president’s detention authority, the president has recently transferred two Libyan detainees to Senegal from the Guantánamo Bay prison (GTMO). The two detainees had been held at the GTMO for 14 years without a trial.

Republicans attempt to prevent future transfers: 

After the transfer of two detainees, Senators Ayotte (R-NH) and Kirk (R-IL), introduced legislation to keep GTMO open and prevent detainee transfers through September of 2017.

UNC will enforce North Carolina’s transgender bathroom law:

Last Tuesday, the president of the University of North Carolina sent a memo informing the various campuses that the university will comply with the new law.

Boston taking a stand against North Carolina transgender law:

In response to North Carolina’s bill preventing transgendered individuals from using public bathrooms that do not match their biological gender, the Boston City Council has voted unanimously to ban taxpayer-funded travel to the state.

Civil Rights Groups Prepare to Fight Mississippi’s new ‘religious freedom’ bill:

Mississippi’s governor signed into law a ‘religious freedom’ bill that allows the denial of certain services to the LGBT community by those who believe that marriage is between a man and a woman, that sex is proper only within such a marriage, and that people are male or female based on their genetics and anatomy at birth. Civil rights groups are organizing a challenge to the law.

Written by

Andrew is a 3L at Harvard Law School, where he serves as an Online Content Editor for the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review and previously served as an Article Editor and Technical Editor on the Harvard Law & Policy Review. Andrew received his B.A. in Political Science from Stanford University in addition to an A.A. in Political Science from Santa Ana College. He has worked at a corporate law firm, the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division, a district attorney’s office, and a public defender’s office. Prior to pursuing his education, Andrew served in the United States Marine Corps, where he deployed overseas twice. Andrew currently lives in Boston with his wife and two children.

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