Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review

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On Thursday, the Supreme Court decided Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin (Fisher II) for the second time, this time affirming the Fifth Circuit’s decision by a 4-3 vote

As we approach November, with presidential candidates jockeying for our support, civil rights and civil liberties advocates have reason to be concerned. Last month, Donald Trump suggested a desire to

Although rarely recognized, Justice Scalia often safeguarded the Fourth Amendment rights of criminal defendants. He did so in an era where, through our email accounts, the government could learn more

Evenwel v. Abbott: 1 person, 1 vote Last Monday, the Supreme Court held that states are allowed to count all residents, regardless of voting eligibility, when drawing election districts. The decision

Voting has long been considered both a civil right and a civic duty. However, that principle has not prevented the disenfranchisement of millions of Americans throughout our history, and this

Supreme Court upholds the principle of “One Person, One Vote” As reported by Ari Berman in the Nation, the Supreme Court in Evenwel v. Abbott, unanimously rejected a challenge to require states

On March 14, 2016, the City of Los Angeles was hit with yet another lawsuit regarding its treatment of homeless residents. The lawsuit, Mitchell v. City of Los Angeles, contends that

The Department of Justice recently reminded state chief justices and state court administrators that jailing poor people just because they can’t pay fines is unconstitutional. In a March 14 Dear Colleague

A Coherent Middle Ground in the Apple-FBI All Writs Act Dispute? LawFare tackles the Apple-FBI controversy and tries to spell out “a moderate position on the scope of the All Writs