Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review

Our criminal justice system acts punitively long after the sentence ends. Most notably, harsh laws continue to punish those convicted of sex offenses throughout their lives. Banished, a recent piece from the Marshall Project, describes the literal ostracism of those

The Trump Administration plans to quietly undo a Department of

The Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review is the nation’s leading progressive law journal.

Founded in 1966 as an instrument to advance personal freedoms and human dignities, CR-CL seeks to catalyze progressive thought and dialogue through publishing innovative legal scholarship and from various perspectives and in diverse fields of study.

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Our criminal justice system acts punitively long after the sentence ends. Most notably, harsh laws continue to punish those convicted of sex offenses throughout their lives. Banished, a recent piece

The ability to vote has been a crucial tenet of American democracy, and one that has unfortunately been denied to too many in our history. This draconian practice of permanently

The Trump Administration plans to quietly undo a Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) regulation banning health care providers and insurers from discriminating against trans patients. To this day, no

In the upcoming November election, Floridians will have the opportunity to vote on proposed Amendment 4—a grassroots, citizen-created amendment—which, if approved, will restore voting eligibility to people with prior felony

What is the purpose of the public school? Professor Justin Driver of the University of Chicago Law School tackles this question in his new book, The Schoolhouse Gate: Public Education,

Welcome to This Week in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Graham Sternberg co-authored this week’s round-up with David Shea. This week the Supreme Court upheld a North Dakota voting law that disproportionately

Holistic admissions policies like Harvard’s have repeatedly been found constitutional, and the law applies similarly here. However, the narrow legal formalism of the courtroom does not allow for meaningful adjudication

In her speech supporting Kavanaugh’s nomination, Senator Susan Collins’s support turned on “[his] presumption of innocence, and fairness.”  While Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, Deborah Ramirez, and Julie Swetnick were not

Welcome to This Week in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Steven Palmer co-authored this week's round-up with Felipe Hernandez   This week the Senate nominated Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court with