Vol. 53, No. 2

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Read about indigenous water rights, prison labor, infrastructural exclusion, and more in the latest edition of the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review.

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Past Volumes

Vol. 53, No. 2, Fall 2018

Read about indigenous water rights, prison labor, infrastructural exclusion, and more in Vol. 53, No. 2.

Vol. 53, No. 1, Winter 2018

Read about the alt-labor movement, sexual abuse in prisons, and the conservation of public lands in Vol. 53, No. 1.

Vol. 52, No. 2, Summer 2017

Read about the role of grand juries in prosecuting unjustified killings by police, pregnancy behind bars, and the undue burden test for abortion in Vol. 52, No. 2.

The Latest

Ames Semi-Final Round – March 12

Welcome to CR-CL’s Live Blog of the Ames Moot Court Semi-Finals! Please scroll down for the live blog. We’ll start blogging shortly before 6:15 PM on March 12, 2019. The Ames Competition is a long-standing tradition at Harvard Law School. The students have gone...

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Taking Liberties Episode 6

Our guests are Rachel Sandalow-Ash and Niharika Singh who discuss their work as members of the organizing committee of the Harvard Graduate Students Union - United Auto Workers.  We discuss history of the union, the committee's effort to secure a contract, and the...

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Ames Semi-Final Round – March 11, 2019

Welcome to CR-CL’s Live Blog of the Ames Moot Court Semi-Finals! Please scroll down for the live blog. We’ll start blogging shortly before 6:15 PM on March 11, 2019. The Ames Competition is a long-standing tradition at Harvard Law School. The students have gone...

read more

This Week in Civil Rights and Civil Liberties: March 11, 2019

This week, the Trump administration is facing massive pushback over its newest gag rule affecting women’s health clinics who provide information about abortion to their patients. Meanwhile, a House Committee is investigating Georgia Governor Brian Kemp over allegations of voter suppression, a group of artists are asking the Supreme Court to review rapper “Mayhem Mal’s” appeal, and leaked documents reveal that the US Government has been secretly tracking activists and journalists at the US-Mexico border.

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The greatest increase in incarceration rates is among women, 80% of those women are mothers, and most of those mothers have children under the age of 13, says Deseriee Kennedy of Touro Law School #NPOC19 @npoc19

So if incarcerated mothers can't pay the extortion-level prices imposed by prison phone monopolies, they might get charged with child neglect and lose their kids — and based on that record, the state might take away your *future* kids #NPOC19

Welfare agencies and judges will decide whether to sever incarcerated mothers' parental ties based on whether they stay in touch with their kids. But poor families can't always afford to visit, and prison phone companies can charge up to $3 a minute to talk to your kids #NPOC19

Deseriee Kennedy talks about the impact the ways mothers are classified as "unfit," criminalized, and separated from their kids because of poverty — and bc they can't afford insurance and stable transportation, their kids are swept up into the system.

Professor Archer of NYU is pointing to the Crime Free Ordinance in Faribault, MN, as an example of how cities make it nearly impossible for residents with *any* contact with the criminal legal system to secure safe & stable housing. Absolutely unconscionable. #NPOC19

Stacy Hawkins of Rutgers Law kicks of #NPOC19 by talking about the danger of Trump's white-washing of the federal bench: black judges are *significantly* more likely than white judges to vote in favor of employment discrimination plaintiffs.

Professor @DeborahNArcher at #NPOC19: a resident does NOT have to be convicted to be evicted under crime-free ordinances. Preponderance of the evidence is enough in most municipalities. They also impose limitations on other private landlords from lending to evicted individuals.

So excited to rep @HarvardCRCL at @npoc19! People of color are leading the intellectual and legal work to secure civil rights, end mass incarceration, and build an economy that works for everyone — can’t wait to hear all about it. We out here!

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Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review
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